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Maths

Friday 10th July

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s Number gymnastics: Biggest number is 98632. Smallest number is 23689 . The highest number – the lowest number = 9 – 2 = 7

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

1.  30 - 9 =    2. 100 - 89 =   3. 80 - 21 =    4. 10 – 9 =    5.   1000 - 150 =

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your chosen times table. Email me your score!

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Choose maths games to play on purple mash. I recommend Bond Bubbles, Fractonios Pizzeria and Funky Platform.

Year 3 do week 12 lesson 4 – bar charts

Year 4 do Week 12 lesson 4 – draw on a grid

If you have time (and you haven’t already done it), try the Friday challenge with your family!

  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 16th July

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers1. 1640    2. 1033    3.  725    4.  7845     5.  39

Thursday’s number gymnastics: Write these numbers in your book: 3  2  8  6  9

What is the biggest number you can form from these 5 digits?

What is the smallest number you can make using all five numbers?

What is the answer if you subtract the lowest number from the highest number?

Times tables – Practise your times table in the way that works best for you! Say it, sing it, write it, play it….

Tasks:

Year 3: Summer term week 12 lesson 3 – pictograms

Year 4: Summer term week 12 lesson 3 – describe position

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Tuesday 14th July

Maths

Fluent in 5:   1. 765 + 875    2. 938 + 95    3.  1023 - 298    4.  8506 - 661    5.  351 ÷ 9

Draw times tables discs for the times table you have chosen.

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Purple mash 2dos: please complete the 2dos I have set for today, then choose a maths game to play.

 

Year 3 – Summer term Week 12 Lesson 2 – add and subtract capacity

 

Year 4 - Summer term Week 12 Lesson 2 – complete a symmetric figure

 

  • Some of your paper learning booklet if you have any left.

Monday 13th July

Answers for Friday’s fluent in 5: 1.  21    2. 101   3. 77    4.  6    5.   54

 

The Countdown game: Today use the numbers    5      8       10      2     50.

                                            Your target is 802. Get as close as you can.

You can only use each number once, and you don’t have to use them all if you don’t need to. You can add, subtract, multiply or divide. Good luck!

This week I want you to practise your own choice of times tables.

Next, do 2 of these tasks:

  • Purple mash 2dos: please complete the 2dos I have set for today, then choose a maths game to play.
  • White rose maths: www.whiterosemaths.com

Year 3 do Summer term Week 12 Lesson 1- compare capacity

 

Year 4 do Summer term Week 12 Lesson 1- Lines of symmetry

 

  • Or carry on with any paper-based maths you have

Friday 10th July

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s Number gymnastics: Biggest number is 96541. Smallest number is 14569 . The highest number – the lowest number = 9 – 1 = 8

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

1.  18 + 3 =    2. 98 + 3 =   3. 100 - 23 =    4. 15 – 9 =    5.   6 x 9 =

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 8x and 9x table. Email me your score!

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Graphs: Collect some data today. It could be next week’s temperatures, or the number of cars parked on different streets around the village, or shoe sizes in your family, anything you want really! Then choose a graph to show this information: a bar chart, a pie chart, or a line graph. You can use 2graph on Purple mash to draw the graph, or you can draw it yourself. Send me a picture of the graph you make!

 

Year 3 do week 11 lesson 4 – Measure capacity.

Year 4 do Week 11 lesson 4 – Quadrilaterals.

If you have time (and you haven’t already done it), also try the Friday challenge with your family!

  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 9th July

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers1. 996    2. 1352    3.  171    4.  4975     5.  168

Thursday’s number gymnastics: Write these numbers in your book:  6   1   5   4   9  .

What is the biggest number you can form from these 5 digits?

What is the smallest number you can make using all five numbers?

What is the answer if you subtract the lowest digit from the highest number?

Times tables – On a clean page, write the answers to  your times table spread out randomly on the page. Next put your finger on each number and say the times table sum. 

Tasks:

  • Line graphs: Answer these questions about your temperature data. Use your graph to help you-   
    • 1. Which was the coldest day?

                        2. Which was the hottest day?

                        3. What is the difference between the hottest temperature and the coldest temperature?

                        4. Did the temperature stay the same all week       

                        5. Describe how the temperature changed over the week.

Year 3: Summer term week 11 lesson 3 – add and subtract mass

Year 4: Summer term week 11 lesson 3 - triangles

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 8th July

 

Hi year 3 and 4 it's Mrs Murray this morning.

 

Task 1

I want you to either print out the sum sheets below and complete the sum you can do or just write the sums out in your book. I know some of you don't know how to do multiplication so just do the ones you can. It is good to keep practicing your technique for adding and subtracting. I would hate to think you had forgotten any skills while you have been at home. 

 

Task 2

Play hit the button on a times table that you need to practice or TTRS for at least 15 minutes

 

Say two of your times tables as fast as you can do to an adult. Get them to time you and see if you get faster

 

There is also a year 4 task on LBQ today too, anyone can have a go at it. If you want to give it a go I'll be very impressed. Today's code is wvc

Wednesday 8th July maths sheets

Tuesday 7th July

Maths

Fluent in 5:   1. 892 + 104    2. 838 + 514    3.  687 - 516    4.  9768 - 4793     5.  56 x 3

Draw times tables discs for the 8x and 9x tables.

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Temperature graph: Yesterday, purple mash drew a line graph of the temperature data you had collected. Today I want you to copy this graph onto a piece of paper. Please use a ruler or a straight edge to draw the two axes, and to join the points on the graph. Give your graph the title ‘Temperatures this week’ and label the x-axis (the horizontal one) with the words ‘day of the week’ and the y-axis (the vertical one) with the words ‘temperature in degrees C’.

 

Year 3 – Summer term Week 11 Lesson 2 – compare mass

 

Year 4 - Summer term Week 11 Lesson 2 – compare and order angles

 

  • Some of your paper learning booklet if you have any left.

Monday 6th July

Answers for Friday’s fluent in 5: 1.  22    2. 109   3. 21    4. 40    5.   65

 

The Countdown game: Today use the numbers    2     4      9     25.

                                            Your target is 93. Get as close as you can (or can you hit the target number?)

You can only use each number once, and you don’t have to use them all if you don’t need to. You can add, subtract, multiply or divide. Good luck!

This week I want you to practise your 8 x and 9 x tables.

Next, do 2 of these tasks:

  • Temperature graph: If you wrote down the temperature each day last week you can now draw a line graph using this information. You can also do this using the weather forecast for this week. Go on purple mash and click on Maths, then 2graph. Write your information in the table ( name of day of the week in the first column and the temperature on that day in the other column) and then click on the line graph icon. The computer will now draw you a line graph. Take a photo or screenshot and email it to me.
  • White rose maths: www.whiterosemaths.com

Year 3 do Summer term Week 1 Lesson 1 - Measure mass.

 

Year 4 do Summer term Week 11 Lesson 1- Identify angles. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos.

 

  • Or carry on with any paper-based maths you have

Friday 3rd July

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s Number gymnastics: Biggest number is 85432. Smallest number is 23458 . The 5 numbers added together = 22.

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.   9 + 13 =    2. 99 + 10 =   3. 25 – 4 =    4. 60 - 20 =    5.   100 - 35 =

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 6x and 7x table. Email me your score!

At least 2 of these tasks:

Then, if you have a printer, print out the nets I have added as a PDF and have a go at making 3d shapes. If you don’t have a printer, then find some 3d boxes (like a cereal box, a chocolate box) and take them apart to see the 2d net that makes them up. Have a go at putting them back together, and try to create your own nets for shapes. (You could look at and copy the ones on the PDF.)

 

Year 3 do week 10 lesson 3 – recognise and describe 3D shapes.

Year 4 do Week 10 lesson 3 – Introducing line graphs.

If you have time (and you haven’t already done it), also try the Friday challenge with your family!

  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 2nd July

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers:  1. 352    2. 207    3.  395    4.  270     5.  13

Thursday’s number gymnastics: Write these numbers in your book:  2   8   5   4    3  .

What is the biggest number you can form from these 4 digits?

What is the smallest number you can make using all four numbers?

What is the answer if you add the four single numbers together?

Times tables – On a clean page, write the answers to  the 6 x table spread out randomly on the page. (So 6 might be in the middle, then 12 is near the top left corner, and 18 is near the bottom of the page, etc. It will look like you have just randomly splatted them all over the page.) Next put your finger on each number and say the times table sum (so when you put your finger on 12 you say 2 x 6 = 12. Then do the same for the7 table in the gaps on the page. Are there any numbers that you don’t need to write again because they are already there from the 6x table? Touch each number and say the times table sum that equals it.

Tasks:

  • Shape drawing: Instead of White Rose Maths today I would like you all to have a go at drawing regular 2d shapes (or polygons) today. A regular polygon has sides that are all the same length. This is straightforward if you have a ruler. If you don’t have a ruler, use a straight edge, and mark your choice of length on it with a pencil, and use it to draw all the sides to that length.

A regular polygon (or shape) should also have the same size angles inside each of its corners. This can be tricky without a protractor or angle measurer, but if you draw a centre line and use the horizontal lines in your book to help it should be enough. Please draw a triangle, a square, a pentagon (5 sides) and a hexagon (6 sides).

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Tuesday 30th June

Maths

Fluent in 5:   1. 263 + 89    2. 859 – 652    3.  591 – 196    4.  45 x 6     5.  78 ÷ 6

Draw times tables discs for the 6x and 7x tables.

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Co-ordinates and translation: Translation sounds difficult, but it is just a way of saying ‘move the shape to another place on the grid’. Watch this Bitesize video to learn more about translation. It will also tell you about reflection and rotation. Then do the activities that follow it:

 

Year 3 – Summer term Week 10 Lesson 1 – draw accurately. I would really advise you to watch this one and do the activities on BBC bitesize.

 

Year 4 - Summer term Week 10 Lesson 2 – comparison, sum and difference. I would really advise you to watch this one and do the activities on BBC bitesize.

 

  • Some of your paper learning booklet if you have any left.

Monday 29th June

Answers for Friday’s fluent in 5: 1.  26     2. 31   3. 49    4. 120    5.   20

 

The Countdown game: Today use the numbers:    3     6      7      10     20.

                                            Your target is 104. Get as close as you can.

You can only use each number once, and you don’t have to use them all if you don’t need to. You can add, subtract, multiply or divide. Good luck!

This week I want you to practise your 6 x and 7 x tables.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Grids and co-ordinates: In the last few weeks we have looked at co-ordinates like (3,4). This is where you have a grid and two axes, an x-axis and a y-axis. You go along the x axis to the first number (along the corridor) and then up the y axis to the second number (up the stairs).

Watch this Bitesize video and then do the activities under the video: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zgthvcw/articles/z96k9qt

 

 

Year 3 do Summer term Week 10 Lesson 2 -  Recognise and describe 2D shapes. Yes I do mean lesson 2. I will be asking you to do lesson 1 tomorrow, then we will do something different on Thursday, and lesson 3 on Friday!

 

Year 4 do Summer term Week 10 Lesson 1- Interpret charts. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos.

 

  • Or carry on with any paper-based maths you have

Friday 26th June

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s Number gymnastics: Biggest number is 8754. Smallest number is 4578 . The 4 numbers added together = 24.

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.   15 + 9 =     2. 100 - 69 =   3. 90 – 41 =    4. 24 x 5 =    5.   80 ÷ 4 =

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 9x and 12x table. Email me your score!

At least 2 of these tasks:

After that choose another maths game from top marks, there are so many to choose from!

  • The LBQ code today is tzm

 

  • www.whiterosemaths.com Year 3 do week 9 lesson 4 – Parallel and perpendicular. Year 4 do Week 9 lesson 4 – solve problems with money. If you have time, also try the Friday challenge with your family!
  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 25th June

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers1. 1596   2. 470   3. 927    4.  557    5. 21

Thursday’s number gymnastics: Write these numbers in your book:  7   5   4    8  .

What is the biggest number you can form from these 4 digits?

What is the smallest number you can make using all four numbers?

What is the answer if you add the four single numbers together?

Times tables – On a clean page, write the answers to  the 9 x table spread out randomly on the page. (So 9 might be in the middle, then 18 is near the top left corner, and 27 is near the bottom of the page, etc. It will look like you have just randomly splatted them all over the page.) Next put your finger on each number and say the times table sum (so when you put your finger on 8 you say 2 x 4 = 8. Then do the same for the 12x table in the gaps on the page. Are there any numbers that you don’t need to write again because they are already there from the 9x table? Touch each number and say the times table sum that equals it.

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Purple Mash: Do the 2dos I have set for you today. The first one is about lines of symmetry. Remember that to count as a line of symmetry, the shapes above an below the line must mirror each other exactly. It is not a line of symmetry if one side of the line has one corner, and the other side of the line has two corners!

The second 2do has pictures of shapes for you to describe. You need to identify how many sides it has, how many corners, whether all the sides are the same length or not, whether all the angles are the same size or not, and how many lines of symmetry the shape has. You can either write this down in your book, or a nice way to do it is to ask someone in your house to join in and make sure they cannot see the shape, describe it and ask them to guess the name of the shape. Then play some of the maths games on purple mash.

  • www.whiterosemaths.com   Year 3: Summer term Week 9 Lesson 3: horizontal and vertical. Please do this one, I think it would be really worthwhile.

Year 4: Summer term Week 9 Lesson 3: Estimating money. I think this would be a good one for you to do, so watch the video and then follow the link to BBC bitesize.

 

LBQ acute and obtuse angles. Today's code is mta

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 24th June

 

Hi it's Mrs Murray today. I hope you are all ready to get your brain going on some maths. 

 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES - I am hoping to be highly impressed by your speedy times tables when you return

 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

PART 2

I'm giving you a choice today but whatever you choose has to last at least 20 minutes.

 

Choice 1 - I guarantee you will love this game. Me and my Evie have tested it out and we really like it Its called Guardians: Defenders of Mathematica https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zd2f7nb/articles/zn2y7nb

 

Choice 2 - You will love this one It’s called Karate Cats and I know the cats will make you smile!  Choose your topic and level (don’t make it too easy, you will need the gold level I think) and go for it! https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zjkphbk/articles/zf4sscw 

 

Choice 3 - LBQ click here https://www.lbq.org/Login to log on. The task is geometric shapes and today's code is one

Choice 4 - If you prefer paper work then click on the mystery attached below and go for it or do the maths mats

Tuesday 23rd June

Maths

Fluent in 5:   1. 984 + 612 =   2. 573 - 103 =   3. 569 + 358 =    4.  853 - 296 =    5. 147 ÷7 =

Draw times tables discs for the 9x and 12x tables.

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Purple Mash tasks: I have set another three 2dos for you. The first is about perimeter. Remember to count the all 1cm lines that make the outside of the shape.  The second is a short activity to put angles (the bit between the two lines that meet at a corner) in order from smallest to largest. The third activity is about acute and obtuse angles. Acute angles are smaller than a right angle and obtuse angles are bigger than a right angle (but less than 180 degrees. When you have done these, choose a maths game like 2race or funky platform to practise your maths skills.
  • White rose maths-

Year 3 – Summer term Week 9 Lesson 2 – compare angles. I would really advise you to watch this one and do the activities on BBC bitesize.

 

Year 4 - Summer term Week 9 Lesson 2 – ordering money, or one of the alternate videos found by clicking on ‘Already covered this content’

 

  • Some of your paper learning booklet if you have any left.
  • LBQ work  Data in a time graph today's code is yao

Monday 22nd June

Answers for Friday’s fluent in 5: 1.  21     2. 19   3. 51    4. 360    5.   20

The Countdown game: I hope you enjoyed this last Monday. If you haven’t done it before, it works just like on the TV show. I want you to use the numbers I have given you to get as close as you can to the number in bold. You can add, subtract, multiply or divide, and you don’t have to use all the numbers if you don’t need to.

Here is an example:  Use these numbers to reach the number in bold:  

                                                4    5     6    7          48

4 + 5 = 9.  9 x 6 =54.   54 – 7 = 47. I think that’s as close as I can get to 48 (Can you get closer?).

Your turn:   10    5     6    9     2       79

This week I want you to practise your 9 x and 12 x tables.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Purple Mash tasks: I have set you three shape 2 dos. The first is about regular and irregular polygons. A regular polygon has all sides the same length, and all angles the same size.

The next 2do asks you to label shapes with their names. It wants you to drag the name onto the arrow that is pointing at the shape. The third task is a game, matching 3D shapes with their names.

Year 3 do Summer term Week 9 Lesson 1 – Right angles in shapes. We have not done much work on angles so do try this if you can. Watch the video and then follow the link to BBC bitesize for more activities.

 

Year 4 do Summer term Week 9 Lesson 1- Pounds and pence. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos, either Estimate answers or Checking strategies.

 

  • Or carry on with any paper-based maths you have
  • LBQ maths - interpret data in a bar chart. Todays code is mcs log on by clicking here https://www.lbq.org/Login

Friday 19th June

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s Number gymnastics: Smallest number is 2479. The 4 numbers added together is 22.

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.  12 + 9 =     2. 100 - 81 =   3. 75 - 24 =    4. 36 x 10 =    5.   60 ÷ 3 =

 

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 4x and 8x table. Email me your score!

 

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Purple Mash: Do the 2dos on Fact Families and Missing Numbers I have set for you. Then play some of the maths games on Purple Mash.
  • www.whiterosemaths.com Either do week 8 lesson 4 for your year group (Year 3 is Problem Solving with Fractions, Year 4 is Round decimals), or try the Week 6 Friday challenge with your family!
  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 18th June

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers1476   2. 111   3. 545     4.  27    5. 276

Thursday’s number gymnastics: Write these numbers in your book:  2    9    7    4  .

The biggest number we can form from these is 9742 (nine thousand, seven hundred and forty two). What is the smallest number you can make using all four numbers?

What is the answer if you add the four single numbers together?

Times tables – On a clean page, write the answers to  the 4 x table spread out randomly on the page. (So 4 might be in the middle, then 8 is near the top left corner, and 12 is near the bottom of the page, etc. It will look like you have just randomly splatted them all over the page.) Next put your finger on each number and say the times table sum (so when you put your finger on 8 you say 2 x 4 = 8. Then do the same for the 8x table in the gaps on the page. Are there any numbers that you don’t need to write again because they are already there from the 4x table? Touch each number and say the times table sum that equals it.

Did you notice that 24 has 6 x 4 = , 3 x 8 =, 8 x 3 =, 4 x 6 =. Can you think of any more times table sums that work for 24?

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Purple Mash: Do the 2dos I have set for you today, then play some of the maths games on purple mash.
  • www.whiterosemaths.com   Year 3: Summer term Week 8 Lesson 3: Subtract fractions.  Or click on ‘already covered this content’ for alternative videos.  Year 4: Summer term Week 8 Lesson 3: Order decimals.  Or click on ‘already covered this content’ for alternative videos.

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 17th June

 

Hi, it is Mrs Murray maths today! 

 

First

We are going to start by playing hit the button for 10 minutes on one of the times tables that you have been learning this week. The choice is your. Click here https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button

 

Second

Now I want you to get an adult to time you for 5 minutes and do the 5 minute times table challenge that we do in class sometimes. I have attached it below. The times tables are in columns and starts with your 2's. Work DOWN the columns choosing the times tables that you know. See how many you get in 5 minutes. 

 

Third

Now I want you to work through the sheet I have attached below called Mrs Murray's maths sheet. Start at the top and work your way through it. Year 3 can so the adds and subtract sums on page 1 and have a go at those add and subtract ones on page 2. Year 4 should be able to do all of the first sheet and some of the 2nd sheet. The last two lines on page 2 are designed for years 5 and 6 so don't worry about those. 

 

Just do what you can and then get a calculator and check your answers carefully. 

 

If you are year 4 and want an extra challenge then go on  LBQ, click here to access https://www.lbq.org/Login and do multiplying by 100

 Today’s code is chn

 

Fourth

Enjoy running around the garden now saying one of your times tables out loud. It's harder to run and talk than you think!

 

 

 

Tuesday 16th June

Maths

Fluent in 5:   1. 245 + 231 =   2. 469 – 358 =   3. 378 + 167 =    4.  502 – 475 =    5. 46 x 6 =

Make times tables matching pairs cards for the 4x and 8x tables and play matching pairs.

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Purple Mash tasks: I have set another two 2dos for you. When you have done these, choose a maths game like 2race or funky platform to practise your maths skills.
  • White rose maths-

Year 3 – Summer term Week 8 Lesson 2 – add fractions, or one of the alternate videos found by clicking on ‘Already covered this content’

 

Year 4 - Summer term Week 8 Lesson 2 – compare decimals, or one of the alternate videos found by clicking on ‘Already covered this content’

 

  • Some of your paper learning booklet if you have any left.

Monday 15th June

 

Answers for Friday’s fluent in 5: 1.  20     2. 26     3. 50     4. 200    5.   11

The Countdown game: Just like on the TV show, I want you to use the numbers I have given you to get as close as you can to the number in bold. You can add, subtract, multiply or divide, and you don’t have to use all the numbers if you don’t need to.

Here is an example:  Use these numbers to reach the number in bold:   

                                                4    5     6    7          48

4 + 5 = 9.  9 x 6 =54.   54 – 7 = 47. I think that’s as close as I can get to 48 (can you get closer?).

Your turn:   3    6     8    5. Get as close as you can to 52.

This week I want you to practise your 4 x and 8 x tables.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Purple Mash tasks: I have set you two 2 dos. They will both help you with times tables. One has Venn diagrams like you used last week. Numbers that only fit into one times table go on one side of the hoops, numbers that only fit into the other times table go in the other side of the hoops, and numbers that are in both times tables go in the overlapping part of the hoops in the middle. The other is a matching game.
  • White rose maths:

Year 3 do Summer term Week 8 Lesson 1 – Order fractions. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos.

 

Year 4 do Summer term Week 8 Lesson 1- Write decimals. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos.

 

  • Or carry on with any paper-based maths you have

Friday 12th June

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s fluent in 5:  1. 204     2. 51    3.  22     4. 3 remainder 2 (3.25 or 3 ¼)     5.  2316    

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.  20 + 80 =     2. 100 - 75 =   3. 50 - 10 =    4. 25 x 10 =    5.   50 ÷ 2 =

 

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 6x and 9x table. Email me your score!

 

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Statistics: Do the task I have set on Learning by Questions (LBQ)
  • www.whiterosemaths.com  Either do these lessons, or try the Week 6 Friday challenge with your family! The lessons are Summer term week 7 lesson 4 for year 3 and year 4.
  • Any paper learning you have.

Thursday 11th June

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers:    1.  3  6   8   9

                                                                     2. 12   18   24   27

                                                          344   66   88

                                                          4. 75   125

                                                          5.2000   4000

 

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 34 x 6     2. 255 ÷ 5    3.  66 x 3     4. 26 ÷ 8      5.  386 x 6    

Times tables – write out and say your 6 x and 9 x tables. Which numbers appear in both of these times tables? Can you see why this happens?

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Statistics: Do the 2dos I have set for you today on purple mash.
  • www.whiterosemaths.com   Year 3: Summer term Week 7 Lesson 3: Equivalent fractions, or click on ‘Already covered this content’ to choose a different video.

 Year 4: Summer term Week 7 Lesson 3: Hundredths as decimals, or click on ‘Already covered this content’ to choose a different video.

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 10th June

 

Hi, it's Mrs Murray here today. I've broken the maths into starters, main courses and desserts (my favourite being sticky toffee pudding!) for year 5 and 6 this week and thought I would let you try the same technique today. 

The idea is that you have to do a starter, a main course and a pudding to have completed a day's maths. You can choose which you want to do. 

 

        Starters

 

 

      Main Courses

 

  • Log on to LBQ here https://www.lbq.org/home and complete any of the consolidation sections. If they only have 10 questions you need to do 2. 
  • Learn the names of the 2D and 3D shapes on the sheet below and then go around the house and outside spotting and writing down examples of the 2 and 3 D shapes off the sheet. Some of these might be tricky so feel free to do the ones you know and either research the others or look at the answer sheet

 

      Desserts

  • Describe a 3D shape to someone and see if they can guess what it is. If they are struggling they might need clues like toblerone comes in this shape!
  • Say one of your times tables in less than 30 seconds
  • Close your eyes and draw a 2D or 3D shape, can someone else tell what it is?
  • Run round the garden saying one of your times tables

Tuesday 9th June

Maths

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1. 12    2.  50    3.  15    4.  27

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 sequences

  1.  Fill in the missing numbers: 1,2,__,4,5,__,7,__,__, 10
  2. 3,6,9,__­­,15,­­__,21,__,__,30
  3. 11, 22, 33, __, 55, __, __, 77, __, 99
  4. 25, 50, __, 100, ___, 150, 175, 200
  5. 1000, ____, 3000, _____, 5000

Draw times tables discs for the 6x and 9x tables

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Statistics: Login to purple mash and do the next statistics 2dos I have set.
  • White rose maths-

Year 3 – Summer term Week 7 Lesson 2 – Equivalent fractions (2), or one of the alternate videos found by clicking on ‘Already covered this content’

 

Year 4 - Summer term Week 7 Lesson 2 – divide 1 digit by 10, or one of the alternate videos found by clicking on ‘Already covered this content’

 

  • Some of your paper learning booklet

Monday 8th June

Maths for year 3 and 4  (Do what you can in 1 hour)

Fluent in 5: sequences:        

                                                1. What comes next? 2,4,6,8,10,__

                                                2. What comes next? 10,20,30,40,__

                                                3. What comes next? 5,7,9,11,13,__

                                                4. What comes next? 7, 12, 17, 22, __

This week I want you to practise your 6 x and 9 x tables.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Data collection and interpretation is called statistics: Login to purple mash and do the statistics 2dos I have set. The tally questions will be revision for some of you, but others will find them tricky. Try both of the 2dos, do your best.
  • White rose maths:

Year 3 do Summer term Week 7 Lesson 1 – equivalent fractions. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos.

 

Year 4 do Summer term Week 7 Lesson 1- tenths as decimals. If you are already confident with this, click on ‘Already covered this content’ and watch one of the suggested videos.

 

  • Or carry on with any paper-based maths you have

Friday 5th June

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s fluent in 5:  1. 114     2. 22    3.  108     4. 8 remainder 1      5.  1416    

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.  15 + 5 =     2. 30 – 4 =   3. 65 - 15 =    4. 20 x 10 =    5.   33 ÷ 3 =

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 7x and 8x table. Email me your score!

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Interpreting data: Answer these questions about your results.
  1. Which had the most?
  2. Which had the least?
  3. What is the total number of things altogether?
  4. Add the first two columns together.
  5. Choose two columns with different sized bars. How many more are there in one column than the other one?

Try the Week 6 Friday challenge with your family!

  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 4th June

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers:  1.  31    2.  121    3.   128    4.  355   5. 655   

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 19 x 6     2. 88 ÷ 4    3.  36 x 3     4. 49 ÷ 6      5.  236 x 6    

Times tables – write out and say your 7 x and 8 x tables. Which numbers appear in both of these times tables. Can you see why this happens?

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Presenting data: Today I want you to use a pencil, ruler and colours to draw graphs for your data. You can use the graphs you created on 2Graph to show you how to draw them if you like. Draw a bar graph and a pie chart in your book.
  • www.whiterosemaths.com   Year 3: Summer term Week 6 Lesson 3: Fraction of a set of objects.  Year 4: Summer term Week 6 Lesson 3: Fraction of a quantity.
  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 3rd June

 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES

Hi, it’s Mrs Murray here and you know how crazy I am about you learning your times tables so here goes…

 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

 

Can you dance round your house saying your times tables?

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

PART 2 – Maths challenges

I want you to complete the sheet below either for year 3 or year 4, it’s a good mixture of different types of maths questions to get you thinking.

 

PART 3 – NUMBOTS of PRODIGY

I want you to log on to Numbots by clicking here https://play.numbots.com/#/intro  or Prodigy https://www.prodigygame.com/ and play for at least 15 minutes.

 

Worksheets for part 2 of maths on Wednesday 3rd June (no need to print just write down your working out and answers in your book)

Tuesday 2nd June

Maths

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1. 795    2.   785    3.  423     4.  647    5.  80

Tuesday’s fluent in 51.  55 - 24    2.  375 - 254    3.   563 - 435    4.  724 – 369   5. 803 - 148   

Draw times tables discs for the 7x and 8x tables

Next do 2 of the following activities

  • Collecting and presenting data: Yesterday you made a table of the numbers of different things, e.g. car colours, flower colours, how many pens, pencils, rubbers in the classroom. (If you haven’t, look at yesterday’s lesson and do it now!). Next, I want you to go on purple mash. On the home page, click on the Maths button, then on 2Graph in tools. In this programme, you can write your results in the table they have provided, and then if you click on the different types of graphs, you can see what your results look like as a graph. See my example below:

Use the programme to draw graphs of your results and send me a photo so I can see them.

  • White rose maths-

 Year 3 – Summer term Week 6 Lesson 2 – Fractions on a number line  

              Year 4 - Summer term Week 6 Lesson 2 – Subtract fractions

  • Some of your paper learning booklet

Monday 1st June

Maths for year 3 and 4  (Do what you can in 1 hour)

Today’s Fluent in 51.   682 + 113    2.   487 + 298    3.  885 - 462     4.  905 - 258     5.   16 x 5

This week I want you to practise your 7 x and 8 x tables.

Next, do 2 of these tasks:

  • Collecting data – Today I want you to go out and count something. It could be the colours of different cars around the village, or the different types of insects in your garden, or the number of different animals you see around the village, or the numbers of different coloured flowers you see. Choose one of my ideas or think of one of your own, then draw a table to record your counting. Keep hold of the table, you will need it tomorrow! Here is my example:

Colour of car

Tally

Number

Red

II

2

Blue

IIII

4

Silver

III

3

Black

I

1

White

5

 

  • White rose maths: Year 3 do Summer term Week 6 Lesson 1 – tenths as decimals, watch the video and then click on the BBC Bitesize link next to the video to do some questions. Year 4 do Summer term Week 6 Lesson 1- add two or more fractions, watch the video then click on the BBC Bitesize link to do their questions.
  • Or carry on with any paper based maths you have.

Friday 22nd May

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s fluent in 5:  1. 324   2. 17     3.  225     4. 28     5.  3328

Answers to positions and coordinates questions:

 

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.  35 + 6 =     2. 32 – 3 =   3. 150 – 45 =    4. 50 x 11 =    5.   30 ÷ 3 =

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 3x and 6x table

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Shapes and coordinates: Today we are going to plot points on the grid to make shapes.

Draw a grid like yesterday that goes from 0 to 5 on the x-axis, and 0 to 5 on the y-axis (it will have 25 squares altogether). Draw a cross at (1,1) and (4, 1) and (1,4) and (4,4). It should look like this:

 

The crosses are the corners of the shape. Join them using straight lines. How many squares does each side have? What shape have you made?

 

Next Draw another grid, just the same, and draw a cross at (1,1) again. Next move 2 squares to the right and draw a cross, then move 3 squares up and draw a cross. It should look like this:

 

Join the crosses with straight lines. What shape have you made now? Mark the angles on the insides of the corners. One of them is a right angle. Do you remember the special way to draw a right angle?

Choose another Friday challenge to do today.

  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 21st May

Maths

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers1.  48    2.  36    3.   7    4.    8    5.   8

Symmetry answers: Square = 4 lines of symmetry, rectangle = 2 lines of symmetry, equilateral triangle = 3 lines of symmetry, a circle has unlimited or infinite lines of symmetry.

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 54 x 6     2. 68 ÷ 4     3.  75 x 3     4. 84 ÷ 3      5.  416 x 8    

Times tables – write out and say your 3 x and 6 x tables. Which numbers appear in both of these times tables. Can you see why this happens?

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Positions and co-ordinates: Please draw vertical lines down your page so that you make a grid like squared paper. Try to make the squares as wide as they are long, but don’t worry about it being perfect. Then draw the lines and numbers on.

The two lines are called axes ( say axees). Each line is an axis.

Phil starts at 0 on the bottom axis (the x-axis) and 0 on the side axis (the y-axis), so he is standing in the corner. He walks 3 squares along to the number 3 on the x-axis. We would write this as (3,0) because he is at 3 on the x-axis and still 0 on the y-axis.

Now he turns and walks upwards 4 squares, then stops. He is now at (3,4).

Use your pencil to follow Phil’s journey and mark the place he  stops with an x.

Now he decides to walk 2 squares forwards, then 1 square up. He stops and looks at his position on the x-axis and on the y-axis. He sees that he is now at (5,5). Lastly, he decides to walk 4 squares back along the x-axis and 2 squares down the y-axis. See his complete journey below.

There is a good video and some activities to do on BBC bitesize: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zgthvcw

Remember always go ‘Along the corridor, then up the stairs’

Or if you prefer, try these questions:

 

  1. Draw another grid. Start at (0,0). Walk 4 squares along, then 1 square up. Fill in these brackets with you new position: (   ,   )
  2. Start at (0,0). Move to the position (4,5) and mark this point with an x.
  3. Start at (0,0). Go to (3,3). Describe the movements you would need to do to get back to (0,0).
  4. Start at (2,3). Move 5 squares along the x-axis and 3 squares up the y-axis. Mark your new position with and x and write your co-ordinates in brackets next to the x.

 

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 20th May

 

Hi It’s Mrs Murray here and you know how crazy I am about you learning your times tables so here goes…

 

PART 1 -Times Tables 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

 

Can you dance round your house saying your times tables?

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

 

PART 2 – Maths challenges

I want you to continue with the Maths on the move home challenge (document below) that we started last week.  If you didn’t do number 10 it is really fun. Remember if you can’t print it our you can just jot the questions and answers down on a page of your book and then cut them out and hide them around the house. If you loved number 10 you can always do it again.

 

 

PART 3 – Numbots or Prodigy

I want you to log on to Numbots by clicking here https://play.numbots.com/#/intro  or Prodigy https://www.prodigygame.com/ and play for at least 15 minutes.

 

Tuesday 19th May

Maths

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1. 477    2.   1285    3.  332     4.  524     5.   18

 

Answers to order the angles: ADBC 

Tuesday’s fluent in 51.  6 x 8    2.  4 x 9    3.   28 ÷ 4    4.  56 ÷ 7    5. 96 ÷ 12

Draw times tables discs for the 6x and 12x tables

 

Next do 2 of the following activities (you can do all 3 if you want!):

  • Symmetry: Try some of these activities for our symmetry topic. They get gradually harder so pick your level and work at your own pace:
  1. Lie down outside, or on a large sheet of paper and ask someone to draw around your outline. Then divide the shape by drawing a line vertically down from the head to the feet. Are the two sides symmetrical? If you can’t tell by looking you could put a mirror vertically along the line and see if the mirror image matches what you have drawn, or if you have used paper, you can fold the paper to see if the sides match up. Now draw a horizontal line from one side of your waist to the other, to divide the shape. are the top half and bottom half symmetrical? Why not?
  2. Draw a butterfly shape, draw a vertical line down the middle and splodge paint on one side. Now fold the paper. Have you made a symmetrical pattern?
  3. Go on www.topmarks.co.uk and search for symmetry activities. Start with symmetry matching, then symmetry sorting, then symmetry shapes, then do the symmetry tutorial. If you want to, try the Symmetry puzzle game, this is more challenging.
  4. Look at the shapes below. The line drawn through them is the line of symmetry. Which shapes are symmetrical along this line of symmetry? (The red shapes are squares). You can draw the shapes yourself and cut them out so that you can fold them to see if they are symmetrical.
  5. As you can see, some shapes have more than one line of symmetry. How many lines of symmetry does a square have? How many does a rectangle have? What about an equilateral triangle (all sides the same length)? What about a circle?

 

  • White rose maths- At the end of each of the Summer term weeks of lessons, there is a Friday challenge. I’d like you to try one of these today and let me know what you think.
  • Some of your paper learning booklet

Monday 18th May

Maths for year 3 and 4  (Do what you can in 1 hour)

Friday’s fluent in 5 answers:   1.  20     2.  11      3. 5     4.  600     5.  5

Shapes and angles answers: 1.  360    2. 360    3. Quadrilateral    4.  180    5. Parallel

Today’s Fluent in 51.   326 + 151    2.   698 + 587    3.  753 - 421     4.  891 - 367     5.   72 ÷ 4

This week I want you to practise your 3x and 6x table.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Directions and angles: First, find some space and follow these instructions:
  1. Stand up and look straight forwards
  2. Write down the name of what you are looking at
  3. Walk 4 steps forwards
  4. Do a 90° turn to the left (remember this is a quarter turn)
  5. Walk 3 steps forwards
  6. Do a 90° turn to the left
  7. Walk forwards 5 steps
  8. Do a 180° turn (a half turn)
  9. walk forwards 5 steps
  10. Do a 270° turn left  (a three-quarter turn)
  11. Walk forwards 3 steps
  12. Do a 90° turn left
  13. Do a 360° turn
  14. Write down what you are looking at now.

Next, draw the path you have taken in your book. Look at what you have drawn. Colour two lines that are perpendicular in red, then colour two lines that are parallel in blue (or any two colours you have)

Finally, let’s recap what we have learned about types of angles:

 

A right angle measures 90° and is drawn like a little square. An acute angle is smaller than a right angle (measures less than 90°), an obtuse angle is greater than a right angle (measures more than 90°). Can you spot a right angle, an acute angle and an obtuse angle in the triangles above?

Put the following angles in order from smallest to largest:

  • White rose maths: Year 3 do Summer term week 3 lesson 4 : Multiply and divide by 3

Year 4 do Summer term week 2 lesson 4: Ordering money

  • Or carry on with any paper based maths you have

Friday 15th May

Maths

Answers to Thursday’s fluent in 5:  1. 52   2. 90     3.  7.5     4. 0.8   5.  1.56

Answers to Angles, lines and circles questions:

1. Right angle  2. Perpendicular   3. 4    4. 90   5. 360    6.  180

Mental fluent in 5 (no pen and paper!):

  1.  15 + 5 =     2. 20 – 9 =   3. 100 – 95 =    4. 60 x 10     5.   50 ÷ 10

Times tables: Ask someone to test you on your 12 x table

At least 2 of these tasks:

  • Angles: Yesterday we learned about right angles. Look back at the lesson if you need to. We saw that the angles around the middle point of  a circle add up to 360°. If you divide a circle into quarters, the angles are right angles, 4 of them, each measuring 90°.

Other shapes have right angles too. Squares and rectangles have right angles on the insides of their corners:

 

As you can see, squares and rectangles have four right angles. Each right angle is 90°. So the angles inside a square or rectangle add up to 360°. Squares and rectangles are types of quadrilaterals.

 

Some triangles look like this:

 

And some are special because they have a right angle in one corner.

They are called right-angled triangles:

 

Whether a triangle has a right angle or not, its 3 angles always add up to 180°.

Some angles are smaller than right angles – they are called acute angles (because they are small and cute?)

Some angles are bigger than right angles – they are called obtuse angles.

 

Now try these questions:

 

  1. What do the angles in a circle add up to?
  2. What do the angles in a square or rectangle add up to?
  3. What other name do squares and rectangles have?
  4. What do the angles in a triangle add up to?
  5. Bonus question: When lines meet or cross at a right angle, it is called a perpendicular line. Do you know what it is called when two lines run alongside each other, never meeting, like train tracks?  Draw these lines and write your answer.

 

Year 3 – Summer term week 4 lesson 4 – Multiplication and division problem solving. Watch the video then click the link to the activities on BBC Bitesize.

Year 4 – Summer term week 2 – Pounds and pence (more work on decimals).

 

  • Any paper learning you have

Thursday 14th May

Maths (Do what you can in 1 hour)

Tuesday’s fluent in 5 answers1.  230    2. 4700    3.   69000    4.  34   5. 160

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 520 ÷ 10     2. 9000 ÷ 100     3.  75 ÷ 10     4. 8 ÷ 10      5.  156 ÷ 100    

Times tables – write out and say your 6 x and 12 x tables. Which numbers appear in both of these times tables. Can you see why this happens?

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Angles, circles and turns – On Tuesday we looked at 2-D shapes, their sides, corners and angles. Look back at the lesson if you need to. We saw that there are angles on the insides of the corners of shapes. Now, circles don’t have corners, but we can still look at their angles.

If you can, go outside and draw a circle on the ground with chalk (or you could draw a circle on a piece of paper). Stand in the middle of the circle and draw a line from you to the edge of the circle. This is your start point. If you turn around, all the way back to your start point, this is a full turn. Try this now. Next, only turn halfway and then draw an end line, you have done a half turn. Now do a quarter turn and draw a line. You should have something like picture 1 below:

 

The circle is nearly divided into quarters. Finish dividing it into quarters by drawing another line from the middle to the edge (picture 2). Next draw the little blue square in the corner of the quarter section like in picture 3. You have just drawn a right angle!

A right angle measures 90 ‘degrees’. Length is measured in cm or mm or m, but angles are measured in degrees or °. A right angle is 90°. There are 4 quarters in our circle, and that means there are 4 right angles around the middle point of the circle. That is 360° altogether. So if you do a full turn in the middle of your circle, you have travelled 360°.

We can learn something about lines here too. When two lines cross and there are right angles in the corners of the cross (like in the circle we drew), we say the lines are perpendicular. Try saying that out loud: per-pen-dic-u-lar. It is a funny word to say, but at least it is spelled like it sounds!

We’ll learn more about shapes and angles tomorrow. For now, try these questions:

 

  1. What do we call and angle that measures 90° and looks like a little square?
  2. What do we call two lines that cross and form right angles?
  3. How many right angles in a circle?
  4. How many degrees does a quarter turn measure?
  5. How many degrees in a full turn?
  6. How many degrees in a half turn?

 

  • www.whiterosemaths.com   Year 3: Summer term week 4 lesson 3 – divide 2 digit by 1 digit – Watch video then click on the BBC bitesize link next to the video for more examples and questions to answer.

   Year 4- Summer term week 2 lesson 2 – Halves and quarters (fractions and decimals) – watch the video and do the activity

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 13th May

 

Hi, It's Mrs Murray today, I'm very excited about today's main activity I think it is going to make you smilesmiley

 

 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES - I'm confident you are going to be impressing me when we get back to school

 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

PART 2 - MATHS ON THE MOVE CHALLENGE

Below you will see a document called maths on the move home challenge. I think it's a great way to do some maths. I want you to choose 5 of the activities to do this week. If you let me know it was fun we might do the others next week. I definitely want you to do number 7 but you can choose the other 4. The cards for number 10 are below if you don't have a printer just jot them down on a piece of paper then hide them.

 

 

 

PART 3 – NUMBOTS

I want you to log on to Numbots by clicking here https://play.numbots.com/#/intro and play for at least 15 minutes. Your password and username are in the front of your homework book and are exactly the same as the ones you use for times tables rockstars.

Tuesday 12th May

Maths

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1. 93   2.   87     3.  3264     4. 276     5. 16

Answers to the time questions: 1. 31   2. 24   3. 1098   4. 30    5. 240   6. 15  

Tuesday’s fluent in 51.  23 x 10    2. 47 x 100    3.   69 x 1000    4.  3.4 x 10   5. 1.6 x 100

 

Next do 2 of the following activities (you can do all 3 if you want!):

  • Shape: Go on a shape hunt around your home. Keep a tally chart like this:

Name of shape

Tally

Circle

III

with a tally, draw lines until you reach 4, 5 is shown by 4 lines down and a diagonal line through them: 

Draw more columns and fill them in for squares, rectangles, triangles, pentagons, hexagons, heptagons and octagons.

Obviously, we live in a 3-D world, so these 2-D shapes will be on the end of 3-D shapes like cylinders, cubes, cuboids, etc. Add the names of 3-D shapes to your tally sheet and see how many of each 3-D shape you can find too.

There are links to pictures of 2-D and 3-D shapes and their names above the date at the top of this page.

 

Next draw a table like this so that you can describe 2-D shapes:

Name of shape

Number of sides

Number of corners

Circle

1

0

Draw more columns so you can describe triangles, square, rectangles, pentagons, hexagons, heptagons and octagons.

Next we will look inside a 2-D shape:

 

I have coloured the corners red, and I have also marked the insides of the corners. These insides are called angles. Add a column called ‘number of angles’ and fill it in for each shape that has corners.

We will look at angles in circles tomorrow.

 

  • White Rose Maths- Year 3: Summer term week 4 lesson 2 – multiply 2 digits by 1 digit,  Year 4- Summer term week 2 lesson 1 – Round decimals.

Join in with the video to practise your skills.

  • More of your home learning pack

 

Bonus challenge – Roman numerals.

Hopefully you have found out that 7 is VII and 8 is VIII.  12 is XII and 13 is XIII.

Try to find out what 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20 are in Roman numerals.

Monday 11th May

Maths for year 3 and 4

Thursday’s fluent in 5 answers:   1.  246     2.  145   3. 675    4. 13    5.  38

Measurement answers:  1.   03:00  2. Both hands pointing down, the hour hand past the 6    

3. 20.15     4. 200 pennies    5. 460 pennies   6. £4.40   7. 340mm   8. 500cm  9. 4L  10. 2600g

 

Today’s Fluent in 51.   962 - 875    2.   4523 - 1259    3.  105 x 2     4.  46 x 6     5.   64 ÷ 4

This week I want you to practise your 12 x table.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Do you know this rhyme?

 

30 days have September, April, June and November

All the rest have 31

Except February dear

Who has 28 normally

And 29 every leap year

 

This tells us how many days are in each month of the year. Use the rhyme to help you fill in this table:

Name of Month

Number of Days it has

January

31

Draw more columns and fill them in until you have done every month of the year.

 

Here is some more information you will need to answer today’s questions. How much do you already know?

There are 60 seconds in a minute.

There are 60 minutes in an hour.

There are 24 hours in a day.

There are 365 days in a normal year and 366 days in a leap year.

There are 12 months in a year.

 

Questions:

  1. How many days are there in July?
  2. How many months are there in 2 years?
  3. How many days are there in 3 leap years?
  4. How many minutes are there in half an hour?
  5. How many minutes are there in 4 hours?
  6. How many seconds are there in quarter of a minute?

 

  • You can also learn about days, weeks, months and years by doing the questions set on LBQ. Google LBQ then connect as a pupil and type in the code to access the questions. (It says they are for year 3, but they are suitable for all of lower KS2) Today's code is smj

 

  • White Rose Maths - Year 3 click Summer term week 4 lesson 1 – Multiplying and dividing by 4 and 8

Year 4 click Summer term week 4 lesson 1 – Multiplying and dividing problem solving

Important: White Rose are no longer providing their worksheets for free, but working along with the videos will still teach you a lot.

  • Or carry on with any paper based maths you have

 

Bonus challenge – Roman numerals.

The Romans lived  thousands of years ago. They didn’t have numbers like ours, they used letters for counting instead!

They used I for 1, II for 2, III for 3.  

5 was V, 4 was IV (one before than 5) 6 was VI (one after than 5)

10 was X, 9 was IX (one before than 10) and 11 was XI

Do you know, or can you find out what 7 and 8 were, what about 12 and 13?

Thursday 7th May

Maths

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 510 – 263     2. 29 x 5      3.  75 x 9      4. 78 ÷ 6     5.  152 ÷ 4

Times tables – write out and say your 3 x, 6 x and 9 x tables. Which numbers appear in more than one of these times tables? (e.g. 18 is in the 3, 6 and 9 times tables). Can you see why this happens?

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Measurement - We have measured lots of different things now: Length, weight, capacity (volume), time and money. Use all you have learned to answer these questions:
  1. Write 3 o’clock in the morning on a digital clock
  2. Draw half past 6 on an analogue clock face
  3. Write quarter past 8 in the evening in 24hr digital time
  4. How many pennies are there in £2?
  5. How many pennies in £4.60?
  6. £7.90 - £3.50 =
  7. What is 34cm in mm?
  8. What is 5m in cm?
  9. What is 4000ml in L?
  10. What is 2.6kg in g?

 

   Year 4- Summer term week 3 lesson 3 and lesson 4 - Divide 2 digit by 1 digit  and then divide 3 digit by 1 digit

(Again you and your child can choose which would be the best for them to do)

 

  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 6th May

 

 

 

 

Hi It’s Mrs Murray here and you know how crazy I am about you learning your times tables so here goes…

 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES

 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

 

 

PART 2 – REVISION OF DIFFERENT TOPICS

 

I want you to click on the two documents that match your year group and answer the mixture of questions please. You can just write the answers and any working out in your book. When you are finished go through the answers with an adult and try and figure out why any questions went wrong. I’d love to know how your scored on each sheet.

PART 3 – NUMBOTS

I want you to log on to Numbots by clicking here https://play.numbots.com/#/intro and play for at least 15 minutes. Your password and username are in the front of your homework book and are exactly the same as the ones you use for times tables rockstars.

Tuesday 5th May

Maths

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1. 465    2.   456     3.  184     4. 584     5. 24

Answers to the measurement questions: 80 degrees C, half (1/2), 2000ml, 11.45am, 9.40am

Next do 2 of the following activities (you can do all 3 if you want!):

  • Converting weights and capacities (volume): Use these facts and place value grids with Doris the decimal point and tenths, hundredths and thousandths to help you answer the questions.

 

1kg = 1000g so multiply by 1000 to go from kg to g (move the numbers 3 places to the left), and divide by 1000 to go from g to kg (move the numbers 3 places to the right).

1L = 1000ml so litres to ml is x by 1000, going from ml to litres is divide by 1000.

 

For example: What is 3249ml in L?

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

th

3

2

4

9

.

 

 

 

ml to L = divide by 1000, move the numbers 3 places to the right:

 

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

th

 

 

 

3

.

2

4

9

So your answer is 3.249L

 

  1. What is 5L in ml?      2. What is 3000g in kg?        3. What is 7500ml in L?    
  1.   What is 200g in kg?   5. What is 2.346kg in g?   6. What is 8.971L in ml?

 

  • White Rose Maths- Year 3: Summer term week 3 lesson 2 – add money,

   Year 4- Summer term week 3 lesson 2 - multiply 3 digit by 1 digit (Again you and your child can choose which would be the best for them to do)

  • More of your home learning pack

Monday 4th May

Maths for year 3 and 4

Friday’s fluent in 5 answers:   1.  10   2.  100   3. 1    4. 15    5.  190

24 hour clock answers:  1.   19:00    2.  23:00    3.  13:20    4.  18:57    5.  20:15    6.  23:35

 

Today’s Fluent in 51.   429 + 36    2.   661 – 205    3.  92 x 2     4.  146 x 4     5.   96 ÷ 4

This week I want you to practise your 9 x table.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • Make a recipe with an adult, carefully measuring the weights and volumes of ingredients, then answer the questions. I have included our bread recipe, but any recipe is fine, as long as it has some liquid so that you can measure in millilitres, as well as solid ingredients to measure in grams.
  • White Rose Maths - Year 3 click Summer term week 3 lesson 1 – Convert pounds and pence

Year 4 click Summer term week 3 lesson 1 – multiply 2-digit number by 1-digit number

Important: Year 3 can choose to do the year 4 work if they/you feel they need to work on multiplication, and year 4 can do the year 3 work if they/you think they need to work on money.

  • Or carry on with any paper based maths you have

Recipe and questions

Bread recipe

500g of strong flour or plain flour or bread flour

300ml of water

7g of yeast

10g of salt (use less if you like less salty bread)

1 teaspoon of oil

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees C
  2. Oil a loaf tin or a baking tray
  3. Sprinkle a thin layer of flour onto the table or worktop
  4. Weigh 500 grams of flour into a large bowl
  5. Next, add the 7g of yeast and the salt
  6. Mix in the water slowly bringing all the ingredients together with your hands to make a dough.
  7. Lift the dough out of the bowl, onto the floury surface and knead it for 10 minutes
  8. Return the kneaded dough to the bowl, cover it, and leave it to rise in a warm place for 2 hours
  9. Once the dough has doubled in size, lift it out of the bowl again and gently knock it back (like kneading but gentler, this gets rid of big bubbles, and gives the bread a better texture)
  10. For a loaf, put the dough into a loaf tin and bake for 30 minutes. For buns, cut the dough into equal sized pieces and shape them into buns. Spread these out on the baking tray and bake for 10 -15 minutes. Enjoy!

Questions

  • How many degrees hotter is 200°C than 120°C?
  • There are 1000 grams in a kilogram. If we use 500g, what fraction of a 1kg bag have we used?
  • There are 1000 millilitres in a litre. How many millilitres would be in 2 litres?
  • If we put the bread in the oven at 11.15am, and cooked it for 30 minutes, what time would it be ready?
  • Buns only take 15 minutes to cook. If we put them into the oven at 9.25am, when would they be ready?

Friday 1st May

Maths

Thursday’s Fluent in 5 answers: 1.  318        2.  820       3.  1500      4.  6 with 1 left over, write this as 6 r 1     5.  27

Fluent in 5: Mental maths challenge – no pencil and paper!

  1.  6 + 4       2.   40 + 60      3.  10 – 9     4.  100 – 85     5. 10 x 19

Ask someone to test you on your 6 x table

Then do 2 of these:

  • The 24 hour clock:

The analogue clock has the numbers 1 to 12 around it. Are there 12 hours in a day?

No, there are 24! Sometimes on digital clocks you see numbers for the hour that are more than 12. It is all very confusing.

What is going on?

 

There are 24 hours in a full day. This means that the analogue clock hour hand has to go around the clock twice in a day, because 24 is two lots of 12.

 

On a digital clock, it will either go through the numbers 1 to 12 twice, or when it gets to 12 noon, the next hour it shows is 13, and it will go up to 23.59. (Instead of 24 it says 00:00 for the start of the next day.)

 

This table should help with the questions underneath:

1 o’clock in the morning

1:00

1 o’clock in the afternoon

13:00

2 o’clock in the morning

2:00

2 o’clock in the afternoon

14:00

3 o’clock in the morning

3:00

3 o’clock in the afternoon

15:00

4 o’clock in the morning

4:00

4 o’clock in the afternoon

16:00

5 o’clock in the morning

5:00

5 o’clock in the evening

17:00

6 o’clock in the morning

6:00

6 o’clock in the evening

18:00

7 o’clock in the morning

7:00

7 o’clock in the evening

19:00

8 o’clock in the morning

8:00

8 o’clock in the evening

20:00

9 o’clock in the morning

9:00

9 o’clock in the evening

21:00

10 o’clock in the morning

10:00

10 o’clock in the evening

22:00

11 o’clock in the morning

11:00

11 o’clock in the evening

23:00

12 noon

12:00

12 midnight

00:00

 

  1. What is 7 o’clock in the evening in 24 hour time?
  2. What is 11 o’clock in the evening in 24 hour time?
  3. What is 20 minutes past 1 in the afternoon in 24 hour time?
  4. What is 57 minutes past 6 in the evening in 24 hour time?
  5. What is quarter past 8 in the evening in 24 hour time?
  6. What is 25 minutes to midnight in 24 hour time?

 

  • White Rose Maths For both year 3 and 4 click on the summer term week 1 Friday maths challenge – get the whole family working on these maths problems!
  • Any paper maths you have left. Make up a few questions of your own to test your family with. See if you can out-think your family!

Thursday 30th April

Maths

Tuesday’s Fluent in 5 answers:   1.  891    2. 1094   3. 23   4. 136   5. 126

Tuesday’s length answers:

Name of object

Length in cm

Length in mm

Length in cm and mm

Line 1

1cm

10mm

 

Line 2

5cm

50mm

 

Line 3

4cm

40mm

 

Line 4

3.5cm

35mm

3cm and 5mm

Length conversions:

1. 80mm   2. 600cm   3.  5m   4. 7cm  5.  9.5cm  6. 2.5m

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 714 – 396     2. 82 x 10       3.  15 x 100      4. 19 ÷ 3     5.  108 ÷ 4

Times tables – write out and say your 6 x, 7 x and 8 x tables. Use TTRS or Numbots to practise more.

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • Telling the time:

Some information first:

 

Then watch the Youtube videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Posbu-VKxU&t=29s and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pht7dTlM0VA and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1AavpvRLvo&t=40s

  • On purple mash, from the home page click on Mathematics, then scroll down to Topics, then click on Time. There are lots of activities here. They get harder as they go along. Hover over an activity and choose your own level, what do you need to learn about time? Do as many activities as you can and tell the time as you move around your house.
  • www.whiterosemaths.com   Year 3 Summer term week 2 lesson 3 – problem solving           Year 4 Summer term week 1 lesson 4 – order decimals
  • Work in your paper booklet.

Wednesday 29th April

 

Morning everyone, it's me Mrs Murray setting work today. I'm VERY excited for you to send me emails of your work through a parents email address. I want to see if you are doing better work than year 5 and 6. I know you can. 

 

Come on year 3 and 4 ...don't let me down. I'll be VERY proud of you if you let me see your work today. 

 

 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES - It's so important I'm always going to set it!

 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

 

 

PART 2 -Variety of sums to keep your brain working hard!

 

Year 3 

 

I want you to have a go at this sheet. just write any working out and the answers in your book or if you prefer print it out using document link at the bottom of today's work

 

 

 

Year 4 

 

I want you to have a go at this sheet. just write any working out and the answers in your book or if you prefer print it out using document link at the bottom of today's work

 

 

 

PART 3 – PRODIGY

I want you to log on to Prodigy using the link below and play for at least 15 minutes. Your password and username are in the front of your homework book. If you can’t find them just get a parent to email me and I will send them to you.

 

https://www.prodigygame.com/

 

It’s a great game and I want you to have fun while learning.

Tuesday 28th April

Maths

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1. 805    2.   116     3.  156     4. 7      5. 132

Multiplication answers: 1.   7 x 9 = 63    2.  12 x 8 = 96     3.    38 x 5 = 190

Division answers: 1.  12 ÷ 3 = 4 aliens    2.  24 ÷ 3 = 8     3.  126 ÷ 6 = 21

Today’s Fluent in 5: 1.   638 + 253      2.  703 + 391    3.   40 - 17     4.   504 - 368     5.    18 x 7

6 x table: Which ones do you always get stuck on? Write those ones out in different colours and practise saying them 3 times.

Next do 2 of the following activities (you can do more if you want!):

  • My measuring length recap below. You need a ruler or a tape measure with cm and mm.
  • The measures 2dos set on purple mash. (If you are finding this hard, read my recap for tips and advice)
  • www.whiterosemaths.com Y3 Summer term week 2 lesson 2 – Subtract fractions             Y4 Summer term week 1 lesson 3 – compare decimals
  • More of your home learning pack

Measuring length

RULES FOR MEASURING LENGTH:

  1. Make sure the start of the object is at the 0 on the ruler (NOT at the start of the ruler)
  2. Hold the ruler straight as you measure

 

Activity

 

Draw a line that measures 1 cm. Then measure the line in mm by counting how many tiny lines from 0 to the end of the line.

 

Draw a table like this:

 

Name of object

Length in cm

Length in mm

Length in cm and mm

Line 1

1cm

 

 

Line 2

5cm

 

 

Line 3

4cm

 

 

Line 4

 

35mm

 

My pencil sharpener

3.1cm

31mm

3cm and 1 mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fill in how many mm a 1cm line measures and fill in Length in mm for Line 1. Don’t worry about the last column for now.

Now draw a line that measures 5 cm, measure how long it is in mm, and fill in the table.

If a line is 4cm long, how many mm is that? Draw this line if you need to and fill in the table.

What do you notice about the cm numbers and the mm numbers?

Can you see that the mm numbers are 10 x bigger? This because every cm has 10mm, so 1 cm is 10mm, 2cm is 20mm, 3cm is 30mm….

 

Next draw a line that is 35mm long. Now measure it in cm. How many full cm is it? 3cm. How many tiny mm are after 3cm? 5mm. This line is 3cm and 5mm. Write this in the last column.

5 mm is half a cm (Look on the ruler). Half is written 0.5 so 3cm and 5mm can also be written 3.5cm. You can write this in the length in cm column for line 4.

 

Now I want you to measure some small objects (your fingernail, a pebble). Write the name of the object in the table, measure it in mm first, then in cm (and any extra mm after a full cm), then use a decimal for the length in cm if you can (this is something you will do lots of in Y5 and 6 so don’t panic if it doesn’t make sense now). I have done an example for you in the table.

 

Converting length measurements

 

There are 10 mm in every 1 cm. So to go from cm to mm, x by 10. e.g.

1cm = 10mm

2cm = 20mm

5 cm = 50mm

10 cm = 100 mm

 

On a place value grid:

H

T

U

 

 

7

To change 7cm to mm, multiply 7 by 10. Which means make it 10 x bigger:

H

T

U

 

7

0

So move it one place to the left.  70mm!

 

To go from mm to cm, divide by 10, or move the number one place to the right:

H

T

U

 

9

0

90mm becomes:

H

T

U

 

 

9

9cm!

 

There are 100cm in every metre, so 1m is 100cm, 2m is 200cmm, 4m is 400cm.

To go from m to cm, multiply the number by 100, or move two places to the left.

To go from cm to m, divide the number by 100, or move two places to the right.

 

Questions:

  1. What is 8cm in mm?        2.    What is 6m in cm?       3. What is 500cm in m?

        4. What is 70mm in cm?        5.   What is 95mm in cm?     6. what is 250cm in m?

Monday 27th April             LBQ code rbq

Maths for year 3 and 4

Friday’s fluent in 5 answers:   1.  10   2.  100   3. 4    4. 40    5.  50

 

Today’s Fluent in 5:    1.  545 + 260 =    2. 910 - 794 =      3. 39 x 4 =     4. 28 ÷ 4 =      5. 396 ÷ 3 = 

This week I want you to practise your 6 x table.

Next, do 2 (or more!) of these tasks:

  • My recap of multiplication and division below
  • The LBQ review questions for multiplication and division   CODE IS rbq
  • White Rose Maths - Year 3 click Summer term week 2 lesson 1 – add fractions

                                 Year 4 click Summer term week 1 lesson 2 – write decimals

  • Or carry on with the home learning pack if you have pages left

Multiplication and division

Lots of people have been asking about this so I thought it would be good to do a recap session.

Work through the examples below and then choose a strategy to answer the questions that are after the explanation.

Multiplication

In multiplication questions, you might hear words like: times, lots of, packs of, baskets of, multiply, altogether, in total.

There are lots of different ways to do multiplication. For example: Jenny has 34 packs of yogurts. Each pack has 4 pots of yogurt. This is 34 lots of 4 yogurts. The sun we need to do is 34 x 4.

Ways to do this: (There are many YouTube videos that explain these methods too)

  • Equal groups – make 4 groups of 34 counters (buttons, sweets, stones). Then count up or add up how many you have (34 + 34 + 34 + 34). Problem – this will take a long time and you need lots of counters! This strategy works better with smaller numbers like 6 x 4.  
  • A bar model shows this:

 

34 +34 +34 +34 = 

  • Place value or Partitioning (Part – whole model) – put 34 into a place value grid to see that you have 3 tens and 4 units, or 30 and 4. Or split up the number in your head to see that you have 30 and 4 (this is partitioning). Now you can multiply (times) both parts by 4.     30 x 4 = 120 and 4 x 4 = 16. Add the answers together: 120 + 16.
  • Written multiplication – this is what we are moving towards in year 3 and 4.  It is important to set the numbers out carefully, and if you get a 2 digit answer (e.g. 12) to remember that you can only put the unit digit in the answer. Put the other digit in the next column.

Set out 34 x 4 in place value columns:     

 

Multiplication questions

               

  1. Hamid has made 7 rows of biscuits. There are 9 biscuits in each row. How many biscuits has he made altogether?  7 x 9 =      
  2. Kaleb has 12 spiders. Each spider has 8 legs. How many legs in total?
  3. Tamira has 38 cousins, each one has 5 toy cars. How many toy cars altogether?

 

Division

In division questions, you might hear words like: divide, share, spread out, how many groups? how many in each group?

There are lots of ways to do division too. For example: Jenny has 136 yogurts. There are 4 in a pack. How many packs are there?

Ways to do this: (Again, YouTube has lots of videos about division methods)

  • Equal groups– Start with 136 counters and make groups of 4. How many groups do you have? Problem- takes a long time and you need lots of counters!
  • A bar model can show you this:

Then use one of the next two methods to find the answer.

  • Place value or Partitioning (Part-whole model)- Write 136 in a place value grid or partition in your head to see that you have 100, 30 and 6. Then divide each part by 4, then add the answers together.
  • Written division – This is what we are moving towards in year 3 and 4. Set out the numbers carefully.

Division questions

  1. Joe can see 12 legs. Each alien has 3 legs. How many aliens are there? 12 ÷ 3 =
  2. If 24 sweets are shared equally between 3 children, how many sweets do they get each?
  3. King Harold has 6 castles. If he has 126 servants, how many servants will be in each castle?

Friday 24th April

Maths

Thursday’s Fluent in 5 answers: 1. 685   2. 460   3.  7100   4. 23    5. 18

Fluent in 5: Mental maths challenge – no pencil and paper!

  1.  3 + 7       2.   25 + 75      3.  10 – 6     4.  100 – 60     5. 10 x 5

Ask someone to test you on your 7 x table

Then do 2 of these:

  • Ordering numbers, fractions and decimals (see below)
  • www.whiterosemaths.com Year 3: week 2 lesson 4 – fractions of a set of objects (3)

Year 4: week 2 lesson 5 – divide 1 or 2 digits by 100

  • A page of maths in the home learning pack

 

Ordering numbers, fractions and decimals

Can you put these numbers in order, starting with the smallest and finishing with the largest? I bet you can:   5  ,  9 ,  1 ,  7,  3.

You are used to seeing these numbers. You can probably imagine them on a number line.

Or you can put them in order because you now that 1 is the smallest, then 3, then 5 ….

When you have seen lots of fractions and decimals, it will become easy to order them too.

Let’s do some practise with them today, starting with fractions.

 

 

Before the Easter holidays, I asked you to make strips of paper and fold them to make halves, or quarters, or fifths, and so on. When these are unfolded, and the fractions are written on, they make number lines for fractions. A number line for fifths would look like this:


 

(it is marked 1 instead of 5/5 but they are the same thing)

With this picture in your mind you could easily put these fifths in order:  2/5     4/5      1/5

All kinds of fractions can go on a number line. If the numerator (top number) is less than the denominator (bottom number) e.g. 1/5 or 4/10, then they will fit between 0 and 1.

Draw a number line starting at 0 and finishing at 1 to help you put these fractions in order:

3/10     1/10      4/10      7/10       8/10

It is trickier to put fractions in order if they are not all the same fraction e.g. not all tenths. For this we need to use equivalent fractions. To put these fractions in order:   2/10      6/10       1/2        4/5

we need to remember that 1/2 is the same as (equivalent to) 5/10, and 4/5 is equivalent to 8/10.

Then we can make a tenths number line like this one to help us put the fractions in the right order.

The right order is 2/101/2 (5/10), 6/10, 4/5 (8/10) 

 

 

You will see that this number line has decimal numbers on too. Spot Doris the decimal point!

Decimals that are less than 1 will fit between 0 and 1. 1/10 is the same as 0.1. We will start to see decimals more and more too.

 

These decimals have got mixed up, use the number line above to help you put them in order from smallest to largest:

0.3     0.9     0.1    0.4     0.2

Now try ordering these from smallest to largest:

  1.  34,    21,    67,   5,    90              
  2. 523,   235,   152,  953
  3. 1/8,   6/8,   8/8,   3/8
  4. 1/2,   3/8,   4/8,    3/4
  5. 0.4,   0.8,   0.9,    0.1
  6. 3.2,  6.1,  1.3,  5.7 (Hint: start by looking at the units digit first)

Thursday 23rd April

Maths

Tuesday’s Fluent in 5 answers:   1. 543    2. 311   3. 29   4. 1863    5. 21

Thursday’s Fluent in 51. 971 – 286   2. 46 x 10 (make it 10 x bigger – use place value grid)                  3.  71 x 100 ( make it 100 x bigger – use place value grid)     4. 69 ÷ 3     5.  72 ÷ 4

Do 2 of the following tasks:

  • The place value and division work below
  • www.whiterosemaths.com Home Learning video and activity, mark your work using the answers button

            Year 3 week 2 lesson 3 – fractions of a set of objects (2)

            Year 4 week 2 lesson 1 – divide 2 digits by 10 (I know we are jumping about a bit – WR maths do things in a slightly different order to us at Thornhill)

  • The next page of maths in your home learning pack

 

Times tables – write out and say your 6 x, 7 x and 8 x tables. Use TTRS or Numbots to practise more.

 

Place value

Today we’ll look at making numbers 10 x smaller or 100 x smaller.

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

6

0

0

.

0

0

The number is 600. Let’s make it 10 x smaller, which means do 600 ÷ 10.

Tens are 10 x smaller than hundreds. We have 6 hundreds. They need to move into the tens column because they are becoming 10 smaller.

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

 

6

0

.

0

0

The 6 has moved 1 place to the right. The zeroes have all moved 1 place too (the hundredths 0 would move into a thousandths column). Our new number is 60, so 600 ÷ 10 = 60.

It is easier to see the movement of the numbers like this:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

6

5

9

.

2

0

When we divide 659.20 by 10 all the numbers move one place to the right:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

 

6

5

.

9

2

Again, the 0 from the hundredths column has moved to a thousandths column.

659.20 ÷ 10 = 65.92

Practise this yourself using numbers you choose. You can start with a place value grid with HTU, and then move on by using Doris the decimal point and the tenths and hundredths columns.

Say we want to make a number 100 x smaller:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

6

0

0

.

0

0

Let’s start with 600 again. This time it will be 600 ÷ 100.

Units are 100 x smaller than hundreds. So the 6 needs to move to the units column this time:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

 

 

6

.

0

0

The 6 has moved two places to the right.

Again it is easier to see that all the numbers move 2 places to the right if we use a number like:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

3

6

5

9

.

2

0

Tens are 100 x smaller than thousandths, and units are 100 x smaller then hundredths. The 3 needs to move to the tens column, and the 6 needs to move to the units column. This movement pushes the other numbers down too. All the numbers move two places to the right:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

th

 

 

3

6

.

5

9

2

We need to show the thousandths (th) column because the 2 has moved into it from the tenths column. 3659.2 ÷ 100 = 36.592

Practise using numbers you choose. Start with a HTU place value grid, and then move on by adding Doris, tenths and hundredths, and thousandths if you need to.

Wednesday 22nd April

 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES

 

First, I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then I want you to get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1

2

3

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. Email me on purple mash and tell em how fast you are. Can you get under 30 seconds?

 

Now I want you to go on to hit the button  https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button and practice the times table you have been learning for at least 10 minutes

 

 

 

PART 2 -GAMES

 

Year 3

I’ve chosen some maths games for you to play today.

 

The first one you can play with an adult or a sibling. It’s called Dotty Six for Two https://nrich.maths.org/10092

 

You will love this one It’s called Karate Cats and I know the cats will make you smile!  Choose your topic and level (don’t make it too easy, you will need the gold level I think) and go for it! https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zjkphbk/articles/zf4sscw 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also want you to play Numbots https://play.numbots.com/#/intro remember your password and username are the same as Times Tables Rockstars

 

 

Year 4

I’ve chosen some maths games for you to play today.

 

The first one you can play with an adult or a sibling. It’s called Dicey operations in Line for two https://nrich.maths.org/10093

 

This one you can do on your own. It involves you thinking about negative numbers. https://nrich.maths.org/5929

 

I guarantee you will love this game. Me and my Evie have tested it out and we really like it Its called Guardians: Defenders of Mathematica https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zd2f7nb/articles/

 

 

I also want you to play Numbots https://play.numbots.com/#/intro remember your password and username are the same as Times Tables Rockstars

Tuesday 21st April

Maths

Monday’s place value answers: Year 3  1. 638   2.   489     3.    273

                                                Year 4: 1.   345.8   2. 7752.10    3.  299.45

Monday’s Fluent in 5 answers:  1.  92     2.  36     3.  84     4. 584    5. 21

 

Today’s Fluent in 5:   1.  469 + 74     2.   196 + 115    3.   51 – 22    4.  621 x 3     5.    84 ÷ 4

Next try to do 2 of the following activities (you can do all 3 if you want!):

      Y4 week 2 lesson 4 – hundredths on a place value grid

  • The next page in your home learning pack

Place value

Today we are looking at multiplying by 10 and by 100. A place value grid can help us here:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

 

2

6

8

.

0

The number is 268. There are no thousands so we leave that column empty. There are no tenths either and that means we put a 0 in that column. If there are none in a column after the start of the number (after the H column in this case) we need to write in a 0 as a place holder. Before the number starts (like the Th column here) we can leave it empty.

Let’s make this number 10 times bigger. That means multiply 268 by 10. 268 x 10. Tens are 10 x bigger than units, hundreds are 10 x bigger than tens and thousands are 10 x bigger than hundreds.

This means that making the 2 hundreds 10 x bigger will turn them into 2 thousands so we need to move the 2 into the thousands column. When we make the 6 tens 10 x bigger, they turn into 6 hundreds, so the 6 moves into the hundreds column. When we make the 8 units 10 x bigger, they turn into 8 tens, so the 8 moves to the tens column. The 0 from the tenths column has moved too, and we need to put another 0 in the now empty tenths column.

Th

H

T

U

.

t

2

6

8

0

.

0

The numbers have all moved one space to the left. So when we make 268 ten times bigger, or 268 x 10 we get 2680.

To make a number 100 x bigger, the place value grid helps again:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

 

3

7

.

0

0

The number is 37. We are going to do 37 x 100.

This time, we need to know that thousands are 100 times bigger than tens, and hundreds are 100 x bigger than units. When we make the 3 tens 100 x bigger, they become 3 thousands, and need to move to the Th column. When we make the 7 units 100 x bigger, they become 7 hundreds, and have to move to the hundreds column:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

H

3

7

0

0

.

0

0

The zeroes from the t and h columns move left two places too, and then we need to put a 0 in each of those empty columns.

The numbers have all moved 2 spaces to the left and we have the number 3700. So making 37 100 x bigger gives us 3700.

Try multiplying some numbers of your own by 10 or 100.

Remember if you x by 10, the numbers will move one place to the left, and you need to fill the empty columns with a 0. If you multiply by 100, the numbers all move two places to the left, and you need to fill the empty columns with a 0.

Monday 20th April

Maths for year 3 and 4

Friday’s place value answers: Year 3: 1.   419    2.   469    3.   669     4.   838     5. 847      6.   937

                                                     Year 4 :   1.   563   2.  572    3.  662   4.  1562    5. 2562    6. 10562

Friday’s fluent in 5 answers:   1.  96   2.  95   3. 18    4. 87    5.  34

 

Monday's Fluent in 5:  1.   49 + 43    2.   61 – 25     3.  28 x 3     4.  146 x 4     5.   63 ÷ 3

Next do 2 of the following tasks (or you can do all 3!):

  • The Place value and subtraction work below
  •  White Rose Maths - Year 3 click week 2 lesson 1 – fractions on a number line

                                            Year 4 click week 2 lesson 3 – hundredths as decimals

  • The first page of maths in your new home learning pack

 

Place value and subtraction

 

Let’s carry on with place value and this time we’ll look at subtraction.

If we put the number 342 in a place value grid:

H

T

U

3

4

2

To find 10 less than this number, we need to look at the tens column. There are 4 tens in the tens column. We need to take one ten away. So we do 4 – 1 (four tens – one ten) which gives us 3 tens in the tens column:

H

T

U

3

3

2

What we’ve done is 342-10 = 332.

Let’s try a bigger number:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

8

3

9

0

.

5

Don’t be put off by Doris the decimal point! This is just another number in a place value grid.

100 less than this number means subtract 100. There are 3 hundreds in the H column. We need to take one hundred away. 3 hundreds – 1 hundred = 2 hundreds so there will now be a 2 in the H column:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

8

2

9

0

.

5

 What if we want to find one less than this number? We need to subtract 1 unit. Oh no! There are no units to take! This is when we need to exchange (or borrow). There is plenty in the tens column. Let’s use 1 ten from the T column.That leaves 8 tens. If we put that in the units column we will have this:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

8

2

8

10

.

5

This looks strange but it means we can take 1 unit away from 10 to give:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

8

2

8

9

.

5

Which is one less than 8290.5.

Now some for you: Year 3 (you can do the year 4 ones after this)

  1.  10 less than 648           2.   100 less than 589      3.    400 less than 673

Year 4: (You can start with the year 3 ones if you like)

  1. 1 less than 346.8          2.   1000 less than 8752.10       3.   10 less than 309.45

 

 

Friday 17th April 2020

Maths for year 3 and 4

Yesterday’s Fluent in 5 answers:      1.   96    2.  95    3. 18    4.    87     5.    34

Today draw a place value grid with HTU. Write in the number 421:

H

T

U

4

2

1

To find 10 more than this number, we need to add 10 to 421. 10 is worth 1 ten. So we need to add it to the 2 tens we already have = 3 tens. So we change the 2 digit to 3:

H

T

U

4

3

1

This is now worth 30.

To find 100 more than 431, we need to add 100 to 431. 100 is 1 hundreds. Add this to the 4 in the hundreds column = 5. Now we have 5 hundreds, or 500.

H

T

U

5

3

1

So far we have added 100 and 10. This is 110! So we have done the addition 421 + 110 = 531.

Now, let’s add 3. This is 3 units, so it needs to be added to the units column. 1 + 3 = 4:

H

T

U

5

3

4

 

Year 3: You can try the year 4 work if you finish this

Start with this:

H

T

U

4

1

3

  1. Add 6 units
  2. Then add 5 tens
  3. Then add 2 hundreds

Start with this:

H

T

U

8

3

7

  1. What is 1 more than 837?
  2. What is 10 more than 837?
  3. What is 100 more than 837?

Year 4: You can do the Year 3 work first, then

  1. What is 1 more than 562?     2.  What  is 10 more than 562?   3.   What is 100 more than 562?
  1. What is 1000 more than 562?  5. 2000 more than 562?      6. 10000 more than 562?

Everyone: Ask someone to test you on your 8 times table. Good luck!

 

There is a task on LBQ called Place value topic review to have a go at Today's code is nrh

Thursday 16th April 2020

Maths for year 3 and 4. Please take photos of your work and send them to me by email.

Answers from Tuesday 14th April: Place value: 1.   836   2.    7602 is seven thousand, six hundred and two.

Fluent in 5:   1. 95    2. 254    3. 64    4. 66     5.  82

 

I draw a place value grid with Th, H, T U (or O). If I have the number 5027, The 5 digit is worth 5 thousand so I write it in the Th column. The 0 digit is worth no hundreds, but I still write it in the H column (it is used as a place holder to keep the thousands and tens apart). The 2 digit is worth 2 tens so I write it in the T column, and the 7 digit is worth 7 units so I write it in the U column:

Th

H

T

U

5

0

2

7

Now, draw a place value grid with Th, H, T, U. Write 7950 in the correct columns. What is each digit worth?

 

Next, draw a new place value grid like this:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have Doris the decimal point! There is also a t column for tenths. A tenth is one part of a whole that has been cut into ten pieces.

The h column is for hundredths. A hundredth is one part of a whole that has been cut into a hundred pieces. Imagine cutting a cupcake into 100 pieces!

Each piece would be tiny! Fill in the columns with the number 9316.78:

Th

H

T

U

.

t

h

9

3

1

6

.

7

8

How many tens are there? How many tenths are there? How many hundreds? How many hundredths?

Fluent in 5: Again, set these sums out in columns before you work them out.

  1.   84 + 12 =        2.  76 + 19 =          3.    39 – 21 =       4.  243 - 156 =       5. 17 x 2 =

White Rose Maths: go to www.whiterosemaths.com and click on Home Learning.

Year 3: Click on Week 1 Lesson 4 – count in tenths. Watch the video and do the activity. Mark it using the answers.

Year 4 : Click on week 1. Watch lessons 3 and 4. You can do the activities for both if you like. If you only do one activity, do week 4 please. Mark your work using the answers.

Times tables: Copy this circle and fill in the empty boxes. I have done the first two for you.

Next make one of these for the times table you practised yesterday.

    WEDNESDAY 15th APRIL 

PART 1 TIMES TABLES

First I want you to be honest and think of a times table that you know you aren't super fast at. Then i want you to  get an adult to google numberjacks times tables followed by the number you want to learn eg. numberjacks times tables 7. Once you have the right one listen to and say it as it goes on at least twice. 

 

I then want you to start by writing out the whole of the times table you have just done numberjacks to  3 TIMES. By that I mean write

1x7 = 7,

2x 7 = 14

3x7-=21 do not write

1,

2,

3,

4,  then go back and put x x x x then 7,7,7 down the page. Write each line across the page or your brain will get in a muddle

 

Once you have done it 3 times then it is time to start reading it aloud. Get an adult to time you on their phone and see if you can improve your time. As you get more confident cover up part of the table. Keep going until you can say the whole thing without looking. 

NOW RUN ROUND OUTSIDE CHANTING YOUR TIMES TABLE AS YOU GO. YOU HAVE TO SAY IT OUT LOUD AT LEAST 4 TIMES SO YOU COULD BE TIRED BY THEN!

 

Now I want you to go on to Purple mash https://www.purplemash.com/#tab/pm-home/games and find your 2do called multiplication. When you open it it will ask if you want to do an assessment or custom. If you choose custom you can choose questions just on the table you have been learning. Play this until you are scoring high. If you can't get on then just get a parent to fire questions at you all mixed up on the table you are learning or write some down for you to answer. 

 

Once you are a whizz at the times table you have been learning then stay in the multiplication 2do and do an assessment. Play a few times and see if you can improve your score. 

 

 

 

 

PART 2 THE 4 OPERATIONS

 

I want you to start at the top of the first image and write the sums out in a book you took home. It would be great if you told an adult what you are doing as you went along as this help you remember what to do. Get an adult to check each sum after you do it.

 

As soon as you get to some that are tricky then I want you to STOP and get an adult to write you out more of the same type of sum so you can practice these. You might be doing more add sums or long multiplication it doesn't matter as long as you are doing something worthwhile to YOU.

 

 

PART 3 - PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

 

Log on to Numbots  https://play.numbots.com/#/intro and go for it. Some people have only 18,000 already. Can you beat them?

 

Remember your username and password are the same as for Times Table Rockstars and they are in the front of your homework book

 

 

Tuesday 14th April 2020

Maths for year 3 and 4

Today, start with a place value grid like this:

H

T

U

 

 

 

 

Or you can write O for ones instead of U for units. It’s up to you. If we write a 4 digit in the tens column and a 5 digit in the units column it will look like this:

H

T

U

 

4

5

This gives us the number 45.

The 4 digit is worth 4 tens or 40. The 5 digit is worth 5 units (or ones) or 5.

  1. Draw a new HTU grid. Write a 3 digit in the tens column and a 6 digit in the units (or ones) column. What is the 3 digit worth? What is the 6 digit worth? Now write an 8 digit in the hundreds column. Read the whole number out loud.
  2. Draw a new grid with a thousands column:

Th

H

T

U

 

 

 

 

Write a 7 digit in the Th column. This is worth 7 thousands or 7000. Imagine if that was pounds! Now write a 2 digit in the units column, a 0 in the tens column, and a 6 digit in the hundreds column. Say this number out loud. Can you write it in words? You can use this table to help with the spelling:

1 = one

6= six

20 = twenty

70 = seventy

2 = two

7 = seven

30 = thirty

80 = eighty

3 = three

8 = eight

40 = forty

90 = ninety

4 = four

9= nine

50 = fifty

Hundred

5= five

10 = ten

60 = sixty

Thousand

 

Fluent in 5: Set a timer for 5 minutes. Write the sums in column (you can use a place value grid to keep the digits in the right columns). Check the + - x  sign to make sure you are doing the right sum!

  1. 53 + 42 =              2.    137 + 117 =           3.     96 - 32 =            4.    84 – 18 =       5.    41 x 2 =

Next go on www.whiterosemaths.com, click on Home Learning.

Year 3: click on week 1 Lesson 3- Tenths. Watch the video and then click on the activity. Do your best. You can watch the videos from earlier days to help you. There is a button to click with the answers to the activity. Let me know by email how you get on.

Year 4: click on week 1 Lesson 2 – Tenths as decimals. Watch the video and then click on the activity. Do your best. You can watch the videos from earlier days to help you. There is a button to click with the answers to the activity. Let me know by email how you get on.

Finally: Write down your 8 times table like this, 1 x 8 =   2 x 8 = ….  Say it out loud 3 times. Say it backwards, say it forwards, say it hanging upside down!

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