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Pupil Premium

Please read the information below which gives details of our Pupil Premium Grant and how we allocate the funding.

Pupil Premium Report September 2017

What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium is a government initiative that targets additional funding at pupils considered to be from deprived backgrounds because research has shown that such pupils underachieve compared to others. The money is provided to ensure that schools are able to support these pupils in achieving their full potential. The government have used pupils who are entitled to Free School Meals (FSM) as an indicator of deprivation and they allocate a fixed amount of money per pupil to schools each financial year based upon the number of pupils who have been registered for FSM at any point during the previous six years.

An amount of money is also allocated to pupils who are looked after by the Local Authority (LAC) and pupils who have a parent/parents who are serving in the armed forces. The government does not dictate how this money should be spent but we are expected to employ strategies that we are confident will breakdown any barriers in attainment between those pupils who are considered to be deprived and those who are not. We are accountable for this allocation of resources and must demonstrate that pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium achieve well compared to other pupils.

How many pupils benefit from Pupil Premium?

2017-18

21 pupils

2016-17

17 pupils increased to 27

2015-16

17 pupils

 

 

How much Pupil Premium Funding does the school receive?

The amount of Pupil Premium allocated to the school varies each year due to the varying numbers of pupils eligible for the funding.

2017-18

£29,317

2016-17

£22,440

2015-16

£20, 168

 

What is the school doing to break down the barriers caused by deprivation?

Thornhill Primary School receives a significant amount of Pupil Premium funding and expenditure is carefully planned each academic year to ensure the maximum impact on the pupils who are in receipt of this.

Each pupil has a specific IEP which is monitored termly and can be adjusted according to need. Pupils with additional needs, according to our disadvantaged pupil matrix, will be given focused support and often receive tailor made programmes.

Our key belief is that pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from:

  • High quality teaching – we ensure this through regular observation, monitoring and a programme of CPD. We work closely with our cluster school partners to upskill our staff and keep them well-informed and inspired
  • Small class sizes- our classes are small and we maximise support staff to ensure all pupils get small group attention and can maximise in-class learning
  • Enrichment- we provide many opportunities through the year for pupils to learn outside the classroom and also maximise opportunities presented by visitors and by having theme days
  • Nurturing and support- We work hard to support all of our families and provide a safe environment for children to learn in. We have small nurture groups which run through the week, we provide specified talk time to those who need it. When required, we provide breakfast, PE Kit and spare uniform to ensure pupils can embrace school life fully
  • Carefully planned and timely interventions- These are often English and Maths based, for example, additional phonics or targeted reading. Some pupils have also received support to develop confidence, physical motor skills and for behaviour and engagement

 

Teaching staff are always clear who is in receipt of Pupil Premium, what the gaps in their learning are and what the potential barriers to this learning may be. Progress for Pupil Premium pupils is tracked and analysed by the leadership team.

 

Are barriers to learning being broken in school?

Pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium at Thornhill Primary School perform extremely well when compared to similar pupils nationally.

 

In 2017

Our Year 6 cohort was 50% Pupil Premium ( 8 pupils, 4 pupil premium)

 

Maths

Writing

SPAG

Reading

Cohort pass

71%

71%

86%

71%

Pupil Premium only pass

50%

50%

75%

50%

Able Pupil Premium Pass

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

There were no Pupil Premium pupils in Year 2 in 2016-17.

 

In Year 1, 44% of pupils were eligible to Pupil Premium funding, 100% of these students passed the phonics screen.

 

 

In 2016,

Our Year 6 cohort was 60% Pupil Premium.

 

Maths

Writing

SPAG

Reading

Cohort pass

80%

100%

100%

100%

Pupil Premium only pass

66%

100%

100%

100%

Able Pupil Premium Pass

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

At Year 2 our cohort was 43% Pupil Premium

 

 

Maths

Writing

SPAG

Reading

Cohort pass

71%

57%

42%

57%

Pupil Premium only pass

66%

66%

33%

66%

Able Pupil Premium Pass

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

In Year 1, 75% pupils passed the phonics screening. None of the pupils in Year 1, received Pupil Premium funding.

 

 

Other Disadvantaged Pupils

At Thornhill Primary we are aware that pupils might be disadvantaged using variety of measures and that access to Pupil Premium funding is not the only measure to explain why there might be barriers to learning.

All pupils are categorised using a disadvantage matrix so that teachers are aware of possible barriers to learning and address possible issues wherever possible.

These are:

 

Economic disadvantage

FSM

Pupil Premium

SEN

2+ Siblings

Disabled

Safeguarding

Parental separation

neglect

Long-term illness in family

code

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

2017-18

50%

22%

32%

23%

59%

6%

15%

40%

9%

18%

% of PP

100%

100%

100%

50%

61%

9%

19%

52%

19%

19%

Percentages correct in September 2017 and subject to change

2016-17

60%

34%

34%

20%

46%

4%

12%

44%

12%

14%

% of PP

100%

100%

100%

29%

58%

100%

29%

58%

5%

29%

 

 

Code

Possible support strategies

0

Reduce costs for activities, collaborative working and trips

Use of library bus to increase reading material

School library with extended hours

Limited number of fundraising occasions in the year

Second hand uniform available/ spare PE and swimming kits

Support with forms

Free after school clubs

1

As above

2

As above

3

Dedicated IEP with support

4

Additional help with homework and home reading

Keeping costs down

Time to talk/ nurture group

5

Dedicated IEP with support

Adjustments and adaptations made to school building

Time to Talk

6

Individualised support linked to area of need

Early Help support using relevant agencies

7

All documents sent to both households

Record of where children are residing

TAC/ TAF if required through Early Help

Time to talk/ Nurture group

8

School library with extended hours

Second hand uniform available/ spare PE and swimming kits

Breakfast provided

Homework help/ extra reading support

Free after school clubs

TAC/ TAF if required through Early Help

 

9

Time to talk/ Nurture group

TAF/TAC through Early Help

Liaison with external agencies (eg) young carers

 

We currently have no pupils classed as EAL in school. However we have several pupils who have parents with limited English skills. We support these families in a variety of ways. Often explaining letters and helping them to navigate online tasks linked to their child.

In 2016, we had one child with EAL in Year 6, he passed his SATs in all Curriculum areas.

Alongside these pupils we also have a vulnerable pupils list, which contains the names of pupils for which we have several concerns, these might be linked to safeguarding, SEN and family break up. However they do also include pupils, where we have concerns which don’t meet the neglect or safeguarding thresholds, but we are still aware that there are challenges at home.

 

Areas for development

Whilst our Pupil Premium children generally do well in Key Stage Two and have done for many years, our results lower down the school are not as good as we would wish. Pupils enter our Reception class with poor language skills and a limited knowledge of the world. Progress through the EYFS is often slow for these pupils and many do not achieve a good level of development in all areas. In almost all cases, writing is the weakest area.

2014-( Pupil Premium – 50% of cohort) – 66% GLD- Pupil Premium-50% GLD

2015- No Pupil Premium pupils

2016- ( Pupil Premium- 37% of cohort) cohort – 25% GLD, Pupil Premium- 0 GLD

2017- (Pupil Premium- 40% of cohort) cohort- 30% GLD, Pupil Premium- 25% GLD

We have targeted this for many years and it continues to be a priority in our School Improvement Plan for 2017-8. Increasing our school age range to include 2-3 year olds in January 2017, was specifically organised as an attempt to target this key area It is hoped that we will see a difference in the overall numbers of pupils achieving a GLD, and in target groups like Pupil Premium students, both in the short and longer term.

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