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Dyspraxia

 

Developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD), also known as dyspraxia, is a condition affecting physical co-ordination that causes a child to perform less well than expected in daily activities for his or her age, and appear to move clumsily.

DCD is thought to be around three or four times more common in boys than girls, and the condition sometimes runs in families.

 

Symptoms of DCD

 

Early developmental milestones of crawling, walking, self-feeding and dressing may be delayed in young children with DCD, and drawing, writing and performance in sports are usually behind what is expected for their age.

 

Although signs of the condition are present from an early age, children vary widely in their rate of development, and DCD isn't usually definitely diagnosed until a child with the condition is around five years old or more.

 

When to seek medical advice

 

Talk to your GP or health visitor – or a nurse, doctor or Mrs Figes ( SENCO) – if you have any concerns about your child's health or development.

 

If necessary, they can refer your child to a community paediatrician, who will assess them and try to identify any developmental problems.

 

How we support children with dyspraxia:

 

Pupils with dyspraxia are likely to have an IEP ( individual education plan)

 

  • being taught ways of carrying out activities they find difficult – such as breaking down difficult movements into much smaller parts and practising them regularly
  • adapting tasks to make them easier – such as using special grips on pens and pencils so they are easier to hold

 

Although DCD doesn't affect how intelligent a child is, it can make it more difficult for them to learn and they may need extra help to keep up at school, this would be addressed in the IEP.

 

Although the physical co-ordination of a child with DCD will remain below average, this often becomes less of a problem as they get older.

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